Welles House, A Haunting Worse than Amityville?

Welles House, A Haunted and Tragic History

The Welles House is located in PA’s Wilkes Barre,  on 46 South Welles Street.  Many locals have believed for years that the house was haunted, however it wasn’t until the 1970’s when the Bennett’s moved into the home that the paranormal reports finally came to light.  Ed and Lorraine Warren, along with Mary Pascarella conducted numerous investigations in the house as well, and determined that the hauntings were demonic in origin.

What evil lurks inside the house located 46 S Welles Street?

The house on 46 South Welles Street in Wilkes-Barre, PA was built around 1860 by Augustus C. Laning.  Augustus Laning (1808-1875) was one of the first industrialists to    come to Wilkes-Barre. He lived there until he sold his company in 1869. Soon after the home was built, there were a number of odd deaths that occurred on Welles Street and tragedy hit Mr. Laning’s fortunes. Laning’s factories burned to the ground in 1850, and he lost his nephew in a terrible lightning accident. His nephew was working with the horses in the barn when a bolt of lightning hit the barn and the barn caught fire.  He was trapped under the carcass of a horse who had been killed in the fire and was unable to get out of the barn and he also perished.

A “mysterious death” outside the Welles house

There are reports of a priest who suddenly dropped dead in front of the house for no apparent reason during the mid 1800′s.

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The house from the late 19th century to the mid 20th century was primarily a rental property, however this did not mean that its owners did not encounter any hardships. The house during these times went through 3 sheriff sales, and had 2 confirmed suicides and 4 deaths on its premises.  Even though the house was mainly used as a rental since it was built, most of tenants resided in the house for long periods of time.Over its 160 year history it is believed that house has been rented more than 50 times.

Did the house develop a demonic personality or was the land cursed?  It seems quite apparent that it’s past inhabitants have felt its destructive effects of what some call a curse. One only needs to do simple research to find many examples of bad luck, financial issues, depression, suicide, psychiatric illnesses, physical illnesses, and alcoholism which all have affected anyone who has owned the house. In 2014 we conducted paranormal investigations at 46 South Welles Street, which were live streamed for three months straight.  It is our conclusion based upon our documented research that house is haunted by a demonic presence that cannot be removed nor is it safe for anyone to live in.

46 South Welles Ownership Timeline

  • May 11, 1846 – Laning’s mother deeded the Welles Street parcel over to Augustus C. Laning, and he is said to have built the house at 46 S. Welles St.

    A “tragedy” hits the Lanning Family

  • May 29, 1875 – After Laning’s death on May 29, 1875, the parcel was divided up, and on June 28, 1876, one B.R. Honeywell bought the land that would become 46 S. Welles St
  • 1894 circa – The 1894 map of Wilkes-Barre shows Honeywell as the property owner, but at some point — county records don’t indicate when — Samuel Sussman gained ownership.
  • Aug. 22, 1919 – Benjamin R. and Margaret Jones bought the property at sheriff’s sale and sold it for $6,000 to Katie Basch on Aug. 22, 1919.
  • May 3, 1939 – Mose and Lillian Rashewsky for $1 on May 3, 1939.
  • May 17, 1965 – Samuel Jacobs bought the property for $5,000 from Lillian Rashewsky’s estate.
  • March 6, 1975 – The property went up for sheriff’s sale again in 1974, however it is finally purchased by Walker and Marianne Bennett. In 1978 however the Benett’s abruptly move out to due to paranormal activity.
  • July 21, 1982 – Katherine “Kaye” Watkins, purchases it from its third sheriff’s sale on July 21, 1982, and lived there until her death on Oct. 26, 2012.
  • December 2013 – Tim Wood purchases the estate.

Welles House Hauntings, Types of Reported Paranormal Activity

  • Unexplained illnesses and depression.
  • Nightly visits from a well-dressed phantom man and the appearance of a ghost of a young girl who walks through doors.
  • Shrieks, moans, and crying that seemed to be coming from the attic and within the house’s walls.
  • Bloody spots appearing on walls and floors in the living room.
  • A daughter being pushed down the stairs only to mysteriously float to the bottom of the landing on her feet unhurt.
  • Unexplained scratches, in groups of threes, would appear on the resident’s bodies.
  • Sounds of boots tramping up and down the floors and in the walls of the house when there was no one on the stairs.

Watch some of the uncut paranormal activity from the Welles House

Sallie House History and Haunting

Sallie House History

The Sallie House is one of the most haunted houses in America. The house is located on 508 North Second Street in Atchison, Kansas. The Sallie House haunting has been featured on TV shows on Sightings, Ghost Adventures, Paranormal Witness, and A Haunting.  Unfortunately, many tourists and paranormal groups visit the home every year unaware of the demon.

History

The historical timeline of the house is typical and does not reveal any tragic events that could trigger a haunting of this magnitude.  The Sallie House is built for the Michael Finney in 1867. The Finney family lived there on and off until 1947.

Four deaths are confirmed under natural causes:

  • M C Finney 1872, Charles James Kathrens (father of Kate Finney) 1874
  • Richard Edwin Finney 1874
  • Agnes Finney 1939

After the Finney’s left the property the house was owned and rented by various people.

Stories of the house hauntings didn’t start until Tony, and Debra Pickman rented the home in 1992. The Pickman’s claim that paranormal activity in the home began slowly.  With objects moving in their child’s room, lights going on and off, and eventually a visitation by a ghostly girl. As time passed, Tony Pickman became the focus of a violent haunting.  The haunting would scratch his body, cause nightmares, and later demonic oppression.

In an attempt to get help from the haunting, the Pickman’s invited numerous psychics to the house and the TV show Sightings. In one episode psychic Peter James concludes that a ghost named “Sallie” was responsible for the haunting.   James believed that “Sallie” died from acute appendicitis at the hands of Dr. Charles Finney. The Pickman’s, after living at the house for two years, eventually moved from the home to remove themselves from the haunting.

Sallie House Urban Legends vs. Fact

There is no factual evidence to support Peter James’s story. One thing we can verify is that the paranormal activity originated with the Pickman’s.

A Pentagram on the basement of the Sallie House

There were no past claims of the paranormal activity at the property.

We do know that a pentagram was found in the basement by the current owner Les Smith after the Pickman’s moved out.  There are no pictures of the pentagram before it was covered up with black spray paint.

Shortly after the first pentagram was covered up another ritual was done.  This picture shows that Satanic Rituals have taken places at the house after the first pentagram was spray painted over.  But by whom?

Regardless, there’s physical evidence that we’ve gathered during our numerous investigations that we can substantiate. According to luminol tests we have conducted in the house, there’s evidence of blood splatter in the master bedroom closet.  The luminol even found demonic sigils on the walls and apertures. In 2012, we discovered a bloody sweater in the attic of the house. Could these physical clues be the cause of the haunting?

Hauntings at the Sallie House

We have concluded that there is no single “hot spot” where the hauntings at the Sallie House are more likely to occur.  Any part of the house can be active at any time with unexplained phenomena.  The master bedroom and closet, Sallie’s room, staircase, living room, kitchen, and basement all can feature haunting activity.  Some of the paranormal activity that we have documented during our live paranormal investigations on video include:

  1. Dark moving shadows that are visible to the human eye
  2. Unexplained voices that heard or captured on audio
  3. Violent physical attacks
  4. Ectoplasm
  5. Electronics failure
  6. Strange electromagnetic field fluctuations
  7. Cold spots/ hot spots
  8. Nightmares
  9. Depression
  10. Poltergeist activity
  11. Feelings of being choked
  12. Demonic possession

Sallie House Paranormal Videos

When Tim Wood first investigated the house in 2007 with KMPS, the house was believed to haunted only by human spirits. However, over time, and with more research it is understood that the haunting is demonic. The demonic activity at the Sallie House is hazardous and numerous investigators from all over the country have experienced it.

Some of the types of demonic activity that we caught on video include:

Demonic Voices

Watch as demonic laugh is caught on video. The laugh was obtained in the basement during the day time at 2:11 pm.

Demon Physical Attacks

The first time Tim Wood ever challenged Sallie House Demon he was attacked. The attack occurred while he was in the master bedroom in the closet while doing a ghost box session. In this paranormal video, you can clearly hear the word “satan” right before Tim is attacked by the demon.

 

Demonic Possession

Tim and John Houser perform a Ouija Experiment in the basement of the Sallie House.  Watch as the experiment goes wrong.

 

Is the Sallie House safe to investigate?

Don’t let looks fool you.  The house is extremely dangerous and can cause both physical and psychological harm.  Tim Wood and his team can attest to the damage that this house has done to him and other investigators over the years.

The Haunted History of Waterdog Lake

Ghosts of Waterdog Lake

Located in Belmont California, Waterdog lake is said to be one of the most haunted lakes in California. Having grown up in the area, I had always heard of ghost stories about the lake, and a murder.  The lake is anything that you would expect to find featured in a horror movie, remote, full of weird vibes, and haunted.

The 100-million-gallon reservoir was built with its primary purpose to facilitate water flow to the Ralston Mansion, which was made a few miles below it.  Simultaneously, the European and Chinese workers assembled an elaborate piping system as the conduit to deliver fresh water down the hill to the estate house for irrigation and human consumption. Ultimately, Water Dog Lake became the primary source of water not only for Ralston mansion, but for the growing town of Belmont. The intricate network of pipes was not completed until 1874.

Why is Waterdog Lake Haunted?

A with most hauntings, tragedy can leaves a dark imprint on the land for the haunting to occur.  Such is the case with Waterdog Lake. On October 2, 1984, Lance Turner’s body was found on the trail at Waterdog Lake, murdered by Jon Dukel, a serial killer. After confessing to the murder, Jon Dunkel described his crime at Waterdog lake as a “Delight in Doing Evil.”

On October 2, 1984, about 7:00 p.m., Belmont resident Margaret Turner called the police to report her 12-year-old son, Lance, missing from soccer practice. That day, Timothy O’Brien had driven his two sons and Lance to soccer practice at the fields behind Ralston Intermediate School.

O’Brien began coaching his team and did not see Lance again. Later, when the practice ended, O’Brien asked Lance’s coach, Ray Williamson, where Lance was. Williamson told him Lance was not at practice that day. Several boys reported seeing Lance head toward Waterdog Lake, three-eighths of a mile from the soccer field. A search followed.

William Russell arrived at 6:00 p.m. to pick up his son from soccer practice and, after taking his son home, joined the search for Lance. About 8:20 p.m., Russell shined a flashlight onto some bushes in a gully off the path to Waterdog Lake and saw feet sticking out of the bushes. Lance’s body was found under the overgrown brush.

Pathologist Peter Benson, M.D., testified Lance had died from blood loss due to multiple stab wounds. Two wounds to the heart were each fatal; two other wounds to the lungs were potentially life-threatening. There were numerous defensive wounds to the arms and hands, as well as scratches, scrapes, and bruises.

Stephanie Olson, Kendra Durham, and Nicole Guthrie, students at Ralston Intermediate School at the time of the Turner homicide, testified that about 3:00 p.m. on October 2, 1984, they left school, skipping volleyball practice, and went down to Waterdog Lake to smoke cigarettes. A man whom Stephanie described as having dirty blond hair, pimples and dirty teeth with a retainer approached them and started a conversation. He told them his name was Jon and said he had graduated from Carlmont High School the year before. He was drinking beer from a tall Budweiser can, which he offered to the girls.

The girls left after about 20 minutes. Another Ralston student saw a man with dirty blond hair near Waterdog Lake about 4:00 p.m. (None of these witnesses was asked to identify the defendant in the courtroom. Olson, Durham, and Guthrie gave the police a description of the man that was incorporated into a composite drawing used in the investigation of the Turner homicide. In his confession to FBI agents, the defendant described talking with the three girls shortly before he killed Turner.)

 

The Paranormal Investigation – Video

Waterdog lake Haunting.

Interesting enough the legend of the haunting revolves around a boy that drowned at the lake, and there have been multiple drownings at the lake.  However one of the most exciting things about Waterdog lake is the old tunnels that were built over a hundred years ago where Satanic Rituals are believed to have taken place.  Is it possible that Jon Dunkel used these tunnels once to perform some ritual before or after he committed his murder?

During my brief stay there I did get multiple EVPs, and I did hear a disembodied voice that was captured on camera when no one was around.  Would you like to see me go back if so let me know by leaving a comment below?

 

Haunted Forests – The Suicide Forest in San Francisco

The Sutro Forest in San Francisco is a beautiful lush forest in the heart of San Francisco, and it is haunted.   The Forest is known for it’s vibrant, lush, densely-packed eucalyptus trees which were once the sight of numerous hangings.

Sutro Forest Dark History

The Sutro Forest was originally planted in the 1880s by Adolph Sutro.  This Forest as beautiful as it is on the outside houses a dark secret.  Since the early 1900’s numerous people came to this Forest to commit numerous suicides.  Most of the suicides that were carried out in this forest were carried out by hanging however some were facilitated by poison.  The forest was an ideal place for to commit self-inflicted death due to the forest being a very secluded place.  Due to the forest being so dense many of the corpses from the suicides would be discovered months after death, which would make identification much more difficult.

San Francisco Call – March 26, 1904:

SUTRO FOREST SUICIDE REMOVED.

The remains of a man that committed suicide in the Sutro forest were removed to the Morgue yesterday afternoon. They were found on top of the hill east of the Almshouse after a search of three hours and a half by Deputy Coroner Meehan and Messenger Carrick. The clothing worn by the suicide was a gray checked summer weight suit, well worn; a soft black hat and a pair of heavy black laced shoes. The body had been lying in the brush for more than a month and was unrecognizable.

San Francisco Call – April 18, 1904

THOMAS MURNANE HANGS HIMSELF FROM A TREE
Once Wealthy Resident of City, Later — Inmate of Almshouse, Kills Himself.

The body of Thomas Murnane, once a wealthy business man of this city, later a physical wreck and inmate of the Almshouse, was found yesterday hanging to the top branch of a tall eucalyptus tree in the Sutro forest. The body was found by L. K. Pryer of 660 Broderick street and A.E. Pinching of 1104 Divisadero street. Murnane had evidently been dead for two months. The body was taken to the Morgue. Nothing of value was found on it.

On February 27 last, Murnane, who formerly lived at 36 Sixth street, disappeared from the Almshouse. The day before his disappearance he told one of his friends, also an Inmate of the Almshouse, that he had tired of a life of poverty. “My last child died a few months ago,” he said, “and since that time I have been dependent on the city for alms. What is life to me, now, where once I had the best of everything?

The next day Murnane disappeared. He was last seen strolling toward the dense growth of trees near the Almshouse, known as the Sutro forest. Although 52 years of age, Murnane climbed the smooth trunk of the tree and, fastening the noose, swung himself into a better world.

San Francisco Call – November 24, 1904:

DESPAIR CAUSES SUICIDE
Baker Missing for Nearly Two Weeks Chooses Lonely Spot at Which to Die
Woman’s Search Ends in Park
Mrs. Daniel Pfeefer Finds Long Looked For Body of Her Husband in Forest

Two weeks ago Daniel Pfeefer, a baker, who lived at 4057 Twenty-fifth street, was reported missing from his home and his faithful wife, had spent the weary fortnight trying to find trace of him. The woman’s search was rewarded yesterday afternoon when she stumbled across his remains strung to the limb of a tree in Sutro Forest, near the Corbett road.

Every day since Pfeefer had been missing his wife hunted over the hills and among the sand dunes for her husband’s body. She was convinced that he had taken his own life and her surmise proved startlingly correct.

Until about six months ago, Pfeefer conducted a small bakery on Church street, near Seventeenth. When he sold out he made no effort to acquire another business or secure employment. About a month ago it was noticed that he acted strangely. He was pensive and he seldom spoke to anyone. On the morning of November 14, he left his home saying that he would return in the evening, but when he did not do so his wife started a search for him. First she visited all of her husband’s haunts, and when she found he had not been seen in any of these, she started about the city inquiring if anyone had seen “a man with a coat buttoned over an undershirt rambling about.” Yesterday, in company with her brother-in-law, Conrad Dettling, she visited the Sutro forest. After several hours tramp she came upon the body, then she went to St. Boniface’s Church for advice and the priests told her to notify the officials.

A strange feature of the case is that while Pfeefer has been missing nearly two weeks, he hanged himself within twenty-four hours of the time he was found. This was determined by the condition of the body. Just where Pfeefer spent the intervening time is hard to tell, but the Morgue officials will endeavor to ascertain. His family say he was, without doubt, insane, and the deed is attributed to insanity.

Paranormal Investigation

I decided to spend one night alone in the forest to see if I could document any signs of paranormal activity.  Immediately when I stepped into the forest I was surrounded by what felt to be a energy that seemed to follow me around.  As the night progressed I was able to capture numerous EVPs, strange magnetic anomalies, and shadow figures that seemed to materialize out of no where.  As I was endlessly walking through the labyrinth of Eucalyptus tree I had seen a figure in a gown on the trail which disappeared. Could this be one of the patients from the Alms House who had ended there life in the forest?

Palace Hotel Ukiah, Haunted and Abandoned

Is the Palace a haunted hotel? This is the question that many locals and paranormal researchers are wondering. This 100-year-old hotel sits abandoned in the heart of Ukiah, full of history and stories, that make it ripe for a haunting,

History

Built-in 1891 the Palace Hotel still stands as a prominent structure in Ukiah, California. The hotel was originally constructed by Mr. Fox and sold the Sandelin family.  They had heard that Mr. Haughsted had lost his life in an oil fire at the hotel and that his widow was eager to sell.

The Sandelin’s purchased a fifty-room, two-bath hotel and all of its furnishings for under $10,000. Eventually, they were able to buy the real estate, too, from Judge J. M. Mannon. Ukiah, the county seat since 1859, had 3,500 inhabitants, twenty saloons and two houses of ill-repute. “Shootouts”, some of which were fatal, were a common phenomenon, but the Palace was more wholesome by reputation.  Instead, its rather respectable patrons could expect a quiet, elegant meal “from soup to nuts” for 75 cents (regular customers paid only 50 cents).

In the early day’s people traveled by train, the Southern Pacific Railroad reaching as far as Eureka with a stop in Will its. Two horse stages met the passengers at Will its and delivered the guests, mostly traveling salespeople, to the hotel. The Palace “bus” was kept at the livery stable next to and underneath the original building. These salesmen paid $1.50 a night for a room and the use of the “sample rooms,” which are now the Ukiah Travel Agency. These rooms were explicitly provided to offer the gentlemen a place to display the wares they brought with them in huge trunks. The structure of the old hotel was both substantial and attractive. To this day one of its more notable architectural qualities is the character of the original brickwork, made by U. N. Briggs at the local brickyard.

No damage was done during the great earthquake of 1906. And in 1915, when Frank Sandelin built the first addition to the hotel, it was only because the
original structure was too small to meet the demand. An extension of twenty or so rooms was built adjacent to the west face of the older building. Considered very modern in its day, it had a bath for every two rooms, and everyone connected. Each room had running water and a wood-burning stove. It was young Walter’s duty to deliver kindling to each room daily, but the guests
were obliged to keep their fires burning. The kitchen stove, too, was woodburning, as was the first steam heat, installed in 1920. Eventually, the primary source of fuel became oil, kept in a 30,000-gallon storage tank, which is still there beneath an office machines store on the ground floor. In 1925, an Otis elevator, which is still running, was installed, soon followed by a large central fireplace in the lobby.

Frank Sandelin died in 1926, and his son Walter took over. In 1928, Walter made friends with a San Francisco garment tycoon who felt another addition to the Palace would be a boon. So convinced was he that he hired an architect for the project before Walter had even agreed to it. He also secured a loan from Wells Fargo by putting up his securities as collateral. In 1929, for $150,000 Walter had built an impressive new addition against the South side of the earlier buildings – fifty-two rooms, each with private bath and a modern lobby. The rooms rented for $3.50 over Walter’s protestations that they were too expensive.

The Depression came, causing severe setbacks in the hotel business. Prohibition had put an end to the sale of liquor. But conventions, such as those of the Native Sons, The Druids, and The Grange, kept the Palace going; and Wells Fargo never pressed the hotel for total payment. Walter’s son Bob, started converting rooms into first-class apartments, which were easily rentable
at $75.00 per month, and, ultimately, it was their partial conversion that enabled the hotel to keep its doors open during the 1930s. Since that time the Palace Hotel has survived the ups and downs of small hotels all over America: gas rationing during a wartime economy in the forties, competition from larger motel chains, and modern preferences for newness and efficiency over age and beauty.  Mr. Sandelin’s younger sister, Stella Douglas, lived at the Palace until major renovations started occurring and forced out her and, as do many senior other members of the community. The owners of the Palace Hotel

The Palace is now shuttered and abandoned, with estimates of seismic repairs and other renovations costing more than 10 million dollars the Hotel is now a shadow of what it used to be.

Paranormal Activity

The Palace hotel is reported to be haunted.  Is it possible that the haunting could be caused by the past hotel guest or by the previous owners? One of the ghosts said to haunt the hotel is Mr. Haughsted who lost his life in an oil fire at the hotel.  Reports have also surfaced of occult / satanic rituals taken place in the rooms of the hotel.  When we investigated the hotel, we did evidence of this room.  During our interviews some of the types of paranormal activity that witnesses have experience included:

  • Shadow figures
  • Full bodied apparitions
  • Disembodied voices
  • Phantom footsteps
  • Feelings of being touched

Paranormal Investigation Video

We were allowed to investigate the hotel live for one night, and we caught numerous unexplained voices and sounds on tape.  In many ways, the Palace Hotel reminded us of the haunted Cecil Hotel, in Los Angeles CA.  At one point I did feel as though something touched me which was pretty eerie.  The building manifested several cold spots and high emf fluctuations which coincided with the paranormal activity which caught on video.  There were times that we did capture evidence of demonic activity.   We do feel that the presence of demonic activity, is a sign that there were occult / rituals that took place on the hotel property.  We also find several animal remains that looked as if they were placed on the ground in a ritualistic manner. The Palace is a fascinating location, however, due to its enormous size and structural issues makes it especially difficult to investigate.

 

St. Ignatius Hospital, Ghosts and Real Paranormal Experiences

In 2016 livescifi.tv was the first paranormal investigation team to spend three nights at St. Ignatius Hospital.  Being the first paranormal team to investigate, this abandoned hospital we had no idea what we were getting ourselves into.  St. Ignatius Hospital in Colfax Washington, is what an abandoned hospital should look, feel, and it is without a doubt haunted by the ghosts of the patients that once walked its halls.

St. Ignatius Hospital History

The St. Ignatius Hospital served the Palouse region of Washington state from 1893-1964. The hospitals’ construction began in 1893 by Rev. Jachern who saw the need for healthcare in the Palouse area of Washington, while the three Sisters of Charity provided medical care in wooden buildings that were located close to the construction of the new hospital. As soon as construction of the St. Ignatius hospital was completed in 1894, it opened its doors. New additions to the hospital were added in 1917 and in 1928 which accommodated longer-term patient care.  The St. Ignatius School of nursing

Sisters of Charity standing next to what would soon be St. Ignatius Hospital

was established and graduated its first class of nurses in 1911. One interesting note is that Washington State’s first two male nurses earned their degrees in 1941 from this school.

However, during the 1950s to 1960s, the hospital began to decline and would eventually close its doors in 1964. Once it closed the building served as assisted living for the elderly and for people with mental disabilities. It is widely speculated that it was during this time that the patients were neglected.

Abandoned St. Ignatius Hospital

Without government assistance, rising healthcare costs, the hospital fell into disrepair and began facing closure. In August of 1964, the state closed St. Ignatius Hospital and built a new hospital in the surrounding area. St. Ignatius Hospital later became an assisted living facility until it was closed in 2000.

Hauntings and Paranormal Experiences at St. Ignatius Hospital

During our three day paranormal a psychic sketch artist

4th Floor Shadow Man at St. Ignatius Hospital – Is this the ghost of F.E. Martin?

reported seeing an unsettling shadow figure numerous times. However, she along with our other investigators were unable to capture the shadow man.  She believed that the shadow man had been in a horrible wreck of some kind.  Interesting enough one of the ghosts that are observed in the abandoned hospital is of F.E. Martin who w the first patient to ever die in St. Ignatius Hospital. In 1893, F.E. Martin was crushed between two railroad cars, only to die on the hospital grounds. His ghost is said to be very active on the first floor and fourth floor and appears to the living as a dark and menacing shadow figure.

Some of the other interesting parts of the investigation, playing ouija in the “left is dead” section of the hospital and coming up with a girls name “Emily” on the board, which was also validated during a live EVP session.  Rosie’s room on the third floor always was very interesting due to that fact during our investigation we had experienced poltergeist activity, audible disembodied voices, and our electronic equipment malfunctioning. To watch the full investigation you can visit our YouTube channel, where the full paranormal investigation can be watched!